The Basic Fort

basicfort

Build a basic and cheap fort for your backyard.

These instructions are a guide to build a 6×6 fort that is roughly ten feet tall. It has a ladder leading into the Deck area. The Deck is four feet from the ground and the roof is four feet from the deck.

It has an option for a sandbox at the bottom.

Cost: The price for the materials to build this project would be dependent upon what material that you purchase. Some lumber is more expensive than others. However, the original structure was created with standard pine so the general cost would be around $200, which would include hardware.

Time: I am not going to waste your time to estimate how long it will take you to assemble this fort. Every person has a different speed and it depends on your tools and expertise, obviously. As well as how much free time that is available to you.
Theoretically, it could be completed in one day. Also theoretically, it could take you a week. If you hire some of the contractors that I’ve heard complained about, it could take them a whole year.

Amazon: https://www.amazon.com/Basic-Fort-Guidebook-Book-14-ebook/dp/B01J4MGSI2

Barnes N Noble: http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/the-basic-fort-ronald-rex/1124197983

You can find more DIY carpentry books here, http://www.amazon.com/Ronald-Rex/e/B00J7HYKD0/

 

Sandbox Fort

sandboxfortpic

These instructions are a guide to build a 8×8 fort that is roughly ten feet tall.  4 foot open area is centered around a square walkway to enter the sandbox on the ground level.  Ladders lead into the housing area and sandbox.  The housing area is four feet from the ground and the roof starts four feet from the deck

Cost:  The price for the materials to build this project would be dependent upon what material that you purchase.  Some lumber is more expensive than others.  However, the original structure was created with standard pine so the general cost would be around $400, which would include hardware.

Time:  I am not going to waste your time to estimate how long it will take you to assemble this fort.  Every person has a different speed and it depends on your tools and expertise, obviously.  As well as how much free time that is available to you.
Theoretically, it could be completed in one day.  Also theoretically, it could take you a week.  If you hire some of the contractors that I’ve heard complained about, it could take them a whole year.

For Kindle: https://www.amazon.com/Sandbox-Fort-Guidebook-Book-13-ebook/dp/B01I115PCM

Barnes n Noble: www.barnesandnoble.com/w/sandbox-fort-ronald-rex/1124068619

In Print ($9.99): https://www.amazon.com/Sandbox-Fort-Guidebook-13/dp/1535135018/

treehouse, fort, playhouse, diy, do it yourself, carpenter, carpentry, guidebook

Chicken Coop instructions

CoopCoverlrge

Build your own chicken coop:

This chicken coop was specifically built in a certain manner. The picture on the front cover was the chicken coop built for this plan.

These instructions are a guide to build a 4×6 chicken coop that is roughly three and a half feet tall. The housing area is two feet from the ground.

I would like to point out that the instructional drawings are not to scale. They are renditions to help visually explain certain details, not to be taken as scale models. They are approximate shapes and patterns but very easy to follow.

I would recommend that you thoroughly read the entire instructions before proceeding with construction. There are options, choices and special notes that may be of interest to you.

Cost: The price for the materials to build this project would be dependent upon what material that you purchase. Some lumber is more expensive than others. However, the original structure was built with standard pine so the general cost would be around $200, that would include hardware.

Barnes and Noble
http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/chicken-coop-ronald-rex/1117261985

Kindle:
http://www.amazon.com/Chicken-Coop-Fort-Guidebook-Ronald-ebook/dp/B00GA8HGXU

 

Buy on paperback ($7.99)
http://www.amazon.com/Chicken-Coop-Fort-Guidebook-Volume/dp/1493790412/

General Rules about which size screws and in what direction

Sometimes there is some confusion about which size screws to choose from.  Typically, you have 1”, 1 ¼”, 1 5/8”, 2”, 2 ½” and 3” screws.

What Direction?

First, you should know what boards are being screwed together and in what direction.  Makes sense.

Always screw through the lesser board into the greater board.  In other words, screw through the thinner width to connect the thicker board.  For example, if you were to screw a 1×4 into a 2×4, you should screw through the 1×4 to enter into the 2×4.

This is not only structural, but very smart.

What Size?

If you are screwing into a 2×4, then you want to use 3” screws.

In this case, the 3” screw goes through the 2×4 on the 2” side (or more precisely, the 1 ½” side.)

If you want to screw together two 1×4 boards, then you use a 1 58” screws.   In this case, the 1 5/8” screw goes through the 1×4 on the 1” side (or more precisely, the ¾” side.)

A carpenter should always choose a screw that is at least twice the width of the board.  3” screws should be used to connect 2x4s and 2x6s.   1 5/8” screws should be used to connect 1x4s and 1x6s.  1 ¼” screws should be used to screw through something that is ½” thick.  1” screws should be used to connect anything less than that.

And as always, make sure the screw is not too long so that it pokes out from the back.  A pointy screw would be unsafe to precious hands.  It would have to be grinded off, which would make the screw useless in the long run and will also reduce your structural integrity for whatever project.

But you also don’t want to use a screw that is too terribly long.  If you use a 3” screw to attach a ½” board to a 2×4, the smooth head will be the only part holding the ½” board together.

Look at a 3” screw.  There is a long portion of it that is smooth and has no threads towards the screw’s head.

You don’t want that.  You want those threads to be a part of keeping the boards tight.  So choose something smaller.

I certainly hope this helps.  Keep building!

Basic Rules about Building a Frame

Building frames is the basic element in most construction.  Your house, apartment, deck and other projects are built with many frames put together to make boxes or floors or whatever.

The first basic rule: your short end of the frame will cap your longer ends.

What do you mean?

If you are building a frame that is 4 feet by 8 feet(4×8), your 4 foot boards will cap your 8 foot boards, or in this case, 7’9″ boards.

         The reason the board is 7’9″ and not 8’0″ is to compensate for the 1 1/2″ from each 4′ board on each end.  In combination, they add up to 3″ and therefore subtract that 3″ from the 8’0″ boards.  Therefore: 7’9″.

You want to make a perfect 4×8 frame.

Rightly so, if you are building a frame from 1x4s, you need to subtract 1 1/2″ from your shorter boards.  Such as, the 4×8 frame would have 2 boards at 4’0″ and 2 boards at 7’10 1/2″.

However, it is not always the case to have your short ends cap the longer boards.  In some cases, it is wiser to have your longer boards cap the shorter ones.  When your longer side is expected to hold weight, the longer boards should cap the shorter boards.

The reason for this: You want the weight to push against the boards and not burden or stress the screws that are connecting your boards.

Good luck with your projects!

 

Find Ronald Rex projects here, http://www.amazon.com/Ronald-Rex/e/B00J7HYKD0/

Odds and Ends: furniture for the home

oddsnends
This is an instructional guide that contains multiple carpentry projects for around the home.

They are in this order:

Toy Box- 1’6” x 1’6” x 3’0”
Outside Bench- 11” x 3’6” x 1’6”
Mail Box- 1’0” x 4’0”
Garden Box- 1’6” x 1’6”
Trellis- 4 x 8
Workbench- 30” x 34” x 6’0”
Birdhouse- 1’4” x 1’6”
Two Step Unit 1’4” x 1’4”

Cost: Generally, each project will cost around 40-150 dollars each, depending on material used.

Time: Most of these projects will take you about a standard 8 hour day, not including drying time for stain, varnish and water sealant.

Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/Odds-Ends-Carpentry-projects-around-ebook/dp/B01EGBA08A/

Barnes n Noble: http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/odds-and-ends-ronald-rex/1123672069

For Print ($7.99): http://www.amazon.com/Odds-Ends-Carpentry-projects-around/dp/1532820402/

 

Two Tier Fort

twotier

This fort was specifically designed in a certain manner. The picture on the front cover is the actual fort that was designed for this plan. Some modifications were made to simplify this plan for the novice.

These instructions are a guide to build a 4×4:4×6 two tier fort that is roughly ten feet tall. It has a ladder leading into a four by eight foot housing area. The housing area is four feet from the ground and the roof is four to six feet from the deck.

I would like to point out that the instructional drawings (illustrations) are not to scale. They are renditions to help visually explain certain details, not to be taken as scale models. They are approximate shapes and patterns.

I would recommend reading the entire instructions before proceeding, thoroughly. There are options, choices and special notes that may be of interest to you.

Cost: The price for the materials to build this project would be dependent upon what material that you purchase. Some lumber is more expensive than others. However, the original structure was created with standard pine so the general cost would be around $500, which would include hardware.

Find on Kindle: http://www.amazon.com/Two-Tier-Fort-Guidebook-Book-ebook/dp/B00R8U35H0

Find at Barnes N Noble:
http://www.barnesandnoble.com/w/two-tier-fort-ronald-rex/1120949632

 

Buy on Paperback $9.99: http://www.amazon.com/Two-Tier-Fort-Guidebook/dp/1508835780